Blog Posts

Arsenic & Old Lace

wintergreen, white peppercorn, anise, cherry blossom  Japanese gin, chambéry blanc, crème de violet, absinthe, orange bitters.   The Martini—or Martine, Martinez, Turf Club—dates back to the very late 1870s, but the cocktail reached its glorious height near the end of the Golden Age.  By American Prohibition, there were hundreds, if not thousands, of riffs on this classic.

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A Note About Coronavirus

Hello all,  One thing we see when studying cocktail and spirits history (and general history) is that “unprecedented” isn’t usually an historically valid adjective.  Nevertheless, the events of 2020 (so far) certainly feel that way, and we have returned to work to help ourselves and you cope in the way we

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Glossary

In the back of our printed menus, we include a glossary so people can choose their own level of engagement.  We’re always at hand to answer questions and tell stories, but in case you’re uncomfortable asking questions we want you to have access to everything you need to make the right choice or satisfy your curiosity.  For the same purpose, here is an electronic version of our glossary from Volume 6.

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The Liberal Cocktail

Bittersweet orange, clove, caramel, dark chocolate Kentucky bourbon, picon, sugar, Bogart bitters Our best-selling “secret” since we opened, the Liberal Cocktail first appeared in George Kappeler’s Modern American Drinks in 1895.  While the original drink relied on rye whiskey, we prefer the vanilla and toffee flavors found in bourbon, so we

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(New and) Improved Holland Cocktail

Apricot, granola, malt, roasted chestnut Barrel-aged genever, French oak syrup, maraschino, absinthe, orange bitters The Holland Cocktail gets its name from the base spirit, genever, a grain-based distillate from the Netherlands.  As the prototype for modern-day gin, genever was one of the most dominant spirits during the Golden Age, with

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Absinthe Is…

Absinthe was a fundamental ingredient in nineteenth-century cocktails, and fundamental to nineteenth-century culture at large.  Beginning its life in 1795, this botanical spirit rose from provincial origins to become the presiding muse of the French empire, of that empire’s arts, and of international imagination.  Simultaneous to its rise, however, absinthe

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